Egyptian Hieroglyphs, Ancient Egypt, Faience Shabti With Tripartite Wig. Circa 380 - 343 BC
The codified
The Ancient Egyptians codified their lives in hieroglyphs in a similar means to how we now codify information into software, websites and smartphone applications or codify behaviours into hardware and electronics. The means to codify and decodify information and behaviours enable us to transcend the natural boundaries of time and space. Not only can our communications carry further when codified, they can also reside in a collective conscious for eternity, if only those receiving communications have the means to decode them.

The Ancient Egyptians codified their lives in hieroglyphs in a similar means to how we now codify information into software, websites and smartphone applications or codify behaviours into hardware and electronics. The means to codify and decodify information and behaviours enable us to transcend the natural boundaries of time and space. Not only can our communications carry further when codified, they can also reside in a collective conscious for eternity, if only those receiving communications have the means to decode them.

The hieroglyphs such as those encoded into this Ancient Egyptian Shabti (a funerary figurine placed in the deceased's tomb to act as servant should it be called upon to do manual labor in the afterlife) opened the world of Ancient Egypt to us once they were finally decoded. The language of Ancient Egypt laid dormant for over 2,000 years, during which time the knowledge required to read and write the hieroglyphics signs of Ancient Egyptian texts was lost. It was finally a French scholar, Jean-Francois Champollion, who realised, in 1822, that hieroglyphs were both pictorial and phonetic - they recorded the sound of the Egyptian language - a realisation that allowed us to translate words and stories from the great objects of the Ancient Egyptian civilisation once again.

Like the Ancient Egyptians' use of Shabtis, we should also consciously prepare ourselves for an afterlife (or a hereditary life for our future generations) where we can have access to tools and support, catering for all likely and unlikely eventualities. Such tools and support might simply be an ability to decode and translate the knowledge and wisdom of the past into the present, a modern day Shabti might be the echo of the ancient Shabti awaiting to assist us, should they ever be called upon again.